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Beyond Carbon: Equity

The changing climate affects not only our natural environment — it exacerbates social inequities, threatens livelihoods and impacts our public health. Drawdown Georgia’s solutions have direct and indirect impact across our state’s diverse populations.

Equity

Too often, communities are left out of the conversation when it comes to climate solutions, and even more often, you bear the worst of climate impacts. Getting it right means that we are all at the table together. The litmus test for each solution must be that it lifts people and communities up.

The chart below captures where we’ll see the most positive environmental benefits — primarily air and water quality improvements. We know that some communities will have concerns about land that is used for large scale solar (or solar farms), so it’s an area to watch. We acknowledge that solar comes with possible downsides, primarily around water and material disposability, so we want to be sure those potential negatives are visible to everyone involved in the process of making the big decisions that will help us scale these solutions.

Largely Positive
Areas to Watch or Address
Limited Impacts or Limited Data
Electricity
Sector Solutions Affordability Workforce and
Business
Diversity
Public Health
Impacts
Accessibility
of Solutions
Cultural Fit &
Way of Life
Large Scale Solar
Cogeneration
Rooftop Solar
Demand Response
Landfill Methane
Buildings & Materials
Sector Solutions Affordability Workforce and
Business
Diversity
Public Health
Impacts
Accessibility
of Solutions
Cultural Fit &
Way of Life
Recycling/Waste Management
Refrigerant
Retrofitting
Food & Agriculture
Sector Solutions Affordability Workforce and
Business
Diversity
Public Health
Impacts
Accessibility
of Solutions
Cultural Fit &
Way of Life
Composting
Conservation Agriculture
Plant Rich Diet
Reduced Food Waste
Land Sinks
Sector Solutions Affordability Workforce and
Business
Diversity
Public Health
Impacts
Accessibility
of Solutions
Cultural Fit &
Way of Life
Coastal Wetlands Restoration
Afforestation & Silvopasture
Temperate Forest Stewardship
Transportation
Sector Solutions Affordability Workforce and
Business
Diversity
Public Health
Impacts
Accessibility
of Solutions
Cultural Fit &
Way of Life
Energy Efficient Cars
Energy Efficient Trucks
Mass Transit
Electric Vehicles
Alternative Mobility

Stories & Studies

Questions?

Why the focus on refrigerants?

One of the largest contributors to refrigerant leakage in Georgia are grocery and convenience store refrigeration systems. There are 958 grocery stores and over 6,000 gas, drug, and convenience stores in Georgia, accounting for about 1.9 MtCO2e leaked annually. Hydrofluorocarbons (HFCs) are a class of chemicals used in refrigerators, freezers, air conditioners, heat pumps, and to transfer heat in applications found throughout Georgia’s economy. We can find alternatives and manage existing HFCs better -- because 90 percent of refrigerant emissions happen at end of life, effective disposal of those currently in circulation is essential. After being carefully removed and stored, refrigerants can be purified for reuse or transformed into other less harmful chemicals.

Which industries dominate in Georgia’s building products?

According to the Georgia Forestry Commission, Georgia is a leader in paper and pulp products, with an economic output of $13.1 billion in 2018, representing almost 20,000 jobs and $1.8 billion in annual wages and salaries.

What is our current recycling rate?

In 2011, Georgia recycled only approximately 0.7 million tons out of 10.6 million tons of MSW, or a recycling rate of about 6.6%. This is significantly below the U.S. average rate of 22.6% reported by the same study (Shin, 2014).

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