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Here’s the deal

Georgia has nearly 90,000 miles of public roads. In 2017, vehicles accounted for 43% of the state’s CO2 emissions -- our single largest source. Switching out gasoline and diesel-powered vehicles for electric vehicles, increasing mass transit, and adopting more alternative mobility options will help us dramatically reduce these emissions.

18
Mt

How do we get there?

Mass Transit

Mass...

When people live where it’s easy to take the bus, the train or a streetcar, it reduces emissions. Growth in mass transit ridership across the state could reduce emissions by 1 million metric tons if we locate 320,000 additional households in Transit Oriented Developments by 2030.

Electric
Vehicles

Elec...

Electric vehicles produce fewer emissions - especially as Georgia’s electricity becomes low-carbon. Putting more electric vehicles on the road while retiring older conventional models could reduce emissions by 1 million metric tons if we replaced 250,000 gasoline-powered vehicles with electric vehicles by 2030.

Energy Efficient
Cars

Ener...

Energy efficient cars are engineered to have better fuel economy, or operate as a hybrid (gas and electric). Putting more energy efficient cars on the road could reduce emissions by 1 million metric tons if new cars purchased in Georgia were at least 3% more fuel efficient than they are today by 2030.

Energy Efficient
Trucks

Ener...

Reducing the diesel fuel consumption from the 4 million registered medium and heavy duty trucks in Georgia comes from increasing fuel efficiency in Georgia’s truck fleet as well as smarter routing to reduce vehicle miles driven overall. If we reduce diesel fuel use in medium duty and heavy duty trucks by 10%, we could reduce emissions by 1 million metric tons by 2030.

Alternative
Mobility

Alte...

Increasing low- and zero-carbon alternatives to car trips is a no-brainer but it’s not always easy to bike, walk, or scooter to your destination. We can build supportive infrastructure like safe bike paths, and increase opportunities for teleworking post-COVID. We could reduce emissions by 1 million metric tons if we eliminate 2.5% of our car trips by 2030.

How do we get there?

Mass Transit

When people live where it’s easy to take the bus, the train or a streetcar, it reduces emissions. Growth in mass transit ridership across the state could reduce emissions by 1 million metric tons if we locate 320,000 additional households in Transit Oriented Developments by 2030.

Electric Vehicles

Electric vehicles produce fewer emissions - especially as Georgia’s electricity becomes low-carbon. Putting more electric vehicles on the road while retiring older conventional models could reduce emissions by 1 million metric tons if new cars purchased in Georgia are just 3% more fuel efficient than the expected baseline by 2030.

Energy Efficient Cars

Energy efficient cars are engineered to have better fuel economy, or operate as a hybrid (gas and electric). Putting more energy efficient cars on the road… could reduce emissions by 1 million metric tons if new cars purchased in Georgia were at least 3% more fuel efficient than they are today by 2030.

Energy Efficient Trucks

There are roughly 400,000 registered medium and heavy duty trucks in Georgia. Reducing the diesel fuel consumption of these vehicles will come from improved fuel efficiency and smarter routing that reduces vehicle miles driven. If we cut diesel fuel use by our medium duty and heavy duty truck fleets by 10%, we will reduce emissions by 1 million metric tons by 2030.

Alternative Mobility

Increasing low- and zero-carbon alternatives to car trips is a no brainer, but it’s not always easy to bike, walk, or scooter to your destination. Communities in the state need more supportive infrastructure like safe bike paths, and continuing opportunities to telework post-COVID. We can cut emissions by 1 Megaton by eliminating just 2.5% of our car trips by 2030.

Here’s where we are

According to The Auto Alliance, an auto industry advocacy group, annual sales of battery electric vehicles in Georgia have recently ranged from a high of 9,945 in 2014 to a low of 1,374 in 2017. In 2014, EV sales represented 2.28% of total light duty vehicle sales in the state. In 2017, EV sales were 0.30% of total sales. There is a lot of potential to grow EV adoption in Georgia.

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Here’s where we are

Stories & Studies

Frequently Asked Questions

What happened to our EV tax break?

In 2015, Georgia's state legislature voted to eliminate the state’s EV tax credit of up to $5,000 for electric vehicles and it established a $200 user fee for EV owners.

Let’s get real, is walking/biking a real alternative for Georgia commuters?

In metro Atlanta, thanks to the Atlanta Regional Commission, we already have approximately 600 miles of marked and/or protected bike lanes, multi-use paths, and “sharrow” streets, which are painted to indicate shared use for bikes and cars. When these urban solutions are combined with other alternatives like buses, rail lines, and carpools, walking and biking can absolutely play a role in helping to reduce the number of cars on Georgia roads.

Why focus on energy efficient cars and trucks?

CO2 emissions are (nearly linearly) correlated to vehicle size and weight. In Georgia, the share of the light duty vehicle fleet that is comprised of larger vehicles (light trucks and SUVs) is about 60% compared to a national average share of about 45%.

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